TMF Reference Model Update

March 18, 2012

TMF RM

The Trial Master File (TMF)

The recommended and required contents of the TMF, the trial master file, continue to be a concern for clinical trial professionals. This blog continues to support the efforts of the DIA working group for the TMF Reference Model, originally issued in 2010. The most recent updates to the TMF RM within Version 1.2, which was released in December 2011, featuring TMF components at the clinical sites along with those kept by the sponsor. The next version of the TMF RM is planned for release in June 2012. There is expected to be some updated content as a result of feedback received from broad industry use of the model, in addition to extension arms of the model for device and investigator-initiated trials. In this Guest Commentary, Lisa Mulcahy, co-chair for the TMF RM working group, explains the basics of the TMF RM.

The Trial Master File Reference Model

The Trial Master File (TMF) Reference Model (RM) is a supported initiative through the Document and Records Management SIAC of the Drug Information Association (DIA), a recognized and highly respected professional association. Creation of the TMF Reference Model has involved more than 230 representatives, all DIA members, from more than 150 bio-pharmaceutical companies, contract research organizations (CROs), consultancies, technical vendors, industry groups, healthcare, academia, non-for-profit / NGO and regulatory agencies. The attention of participants is drawn to the non-commercial nature of this forum. Although it is acknowledged that the resulting reference model ultimately needs to integrate with commercially available products, this was by no means a forum for promotion of products and companies.

The TMF RM was first released in June of 2010 and is a reference for the biopharmaceutical research industry. The model clearly outlines the content and organization of TMF content, at both Sponsor and Investigator site. TMF RM is a reference for the industry and should not be considered mandatory, but rather as an opportunity for standardization across the industry. The TMF RM can be adapted to an electronic or a paper TMF and does not endorse, nor by design, require, any specific technology for application.

The goal of the TMF RM is to provide a single, unified interpretation of the regulations via document listing which would be accepted across the industry. It does not provide guidance in the process by which the document is the output.

Use of the model

The uptake of the TMF RM is broad and it is at a minimum being used as a tool to compare against sponsor already-defined TMF content. It is most often though being adapted or adopted by companies as it provides a comprehensive listing of content created in support of a clinical trial.

Rationale for the creation of a model

The TMF contains those essential documents that individually and collectively permit the evaluation of the conduct of a trial and the quality of the data produced. These documents serve to demonstrate the compliance of the investigator, sponsor, and monitor with the standards of GCP and with all applicable regulatory requirements (ICH Guideline for Good Clinical Practice, E6, Section 8).

TMF Reference Model

ICH E6

Regulatory guidance, such as ICH E6 section 8, addresses only a sub-set of TMF documents. Documentation requirements for the set-up and maintenance of quality systems, electronic systems, safety monitoring, and proof of an adequate and well-controlled trial, to name a few, exist in various regulations across many countries or regions, but not in ICH E6.

The following are additional reasons for creation of the TMF RM

• All companies and investigators conducting clinical trials in the pharmaceutical/biotech industry maintain documentation for each clinical trial. Each company has their own unique TMF structure as defined by their SOPs. No comprehensive common model exists for managing TMF documents. Over the conduct of a trial many functions contribute to the TMF, although oversight of the content is usually not one function’s responsibility – resulting in a highly inefficient work processes including but not limited to:

• All drug development companies and CROs expend considerable resources defining the content of the trial master file for each clinical trial. Consequently, Investigators have the challenge of adapting to different formats and TMF content organization with each clinical trial.

• The burden is very high on smaller companies that usually have limited document management expertise and limited financial resources.

• Records and information exchange between collaborating companies is extremely cumbersome, potentially preventing the joint venture or transfer of an investigational product.

• Regulators are challenged with varying terminology and file structures, creating inefficiency and variability during audits
Organization of the model

TMF

TMF Artifacts

Defined in the model are document types, called artifacts, which one would expect to find in a TMF, at both Sponsor and Investigator site. The artifacts are labeled either core, meaning it must be in the TMF as dictated by either the ICH Guidelines, regulations, or the TMF RM group (if applicable for the trial), or recommended meaning the artifact does not have to be produced but if it is created or collected, it is recommended to be in the TMF. Since the industry often uses unique names, alternate names (as relevant) and descriptions are supplied for each artifact. If the artifact is referenced in the ICH Guidelines, this information is captured.

The artifacts have been organized by Zone – where like artifacts are grouped together:

• Zone 1 Trial Management
• Zone 2 Central Trial Documents
• Zone 3 Regulatory
• Zone 4 IRB/IEC and Other Approvals
• Zone 5 Site Management
• Zone 6 Investigational Product (IP) and Trial Supplies
• Zone 7 Safety Reporting
• Zone 8 Centralized Testing
• Zone 9 Third Parties
• Zone 10 Data Management
• Zone 11 Statistics

Artifacts are created and can exist at multiple levels such as trial, country, and site. An artifact, such as “Safety Management Plan” exists at only 1 of the levels, the trial level. In contrast, the artifact “Informed Consent” can exist at all three levels. These levels can be used to define the paper format TMF.
The TMF RM can be found, free to the public using the following link (cut and paste into web browser address bar:

Metadata

The TMF reference model also details basic metadata which can be used as a starting point for building TMF electronic content management processes. This metadata model can be applicable in all electronic settings, from the straightforward file share to the complex enterprise system.

TMF Reference Model

"This model is designed to capture the unique set of documents"

The trial number is captured on each of the artifacts in the TMF RM. Since this model is designed to capture the unique set of documents associated with a single trial, the trial number is attached to each artifact. Inherited metadata such as Product/Compound, Indication, Trial Phase, and Route is also attached to each artifact and would be required to be entered only once, dependent upon system design.

Date format and convention for which date is captured on an artifact present on every artifact and has been left to those interpreting the reference model within already defined processes. Artifacts would have country metadata associated with them if they were to be created for a specific country and a site number/ID if created at the site level.

Lisa Mulcahy

The TMF RM Online

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Please join your industry colleagues in completing the 2012 TMF Reference Model Survey, and use results to inform your TMF best practices.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/FPP8DCF

This fifteen minute survey is designed by members of the TMF Reference Model team to provide valuable insight into Trial Master File practices, both paper and electronic, to identify common problem areas, assess changes in practice and reveal opportunities for improvement. All respondents who complete the survey and provide contact information will be provided with the survey results.

Data collection closes June 1st; please join us today.

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======== A GxP Perspectives Editorial ========

It came as a surprise that Wikipedia, under Electronic trial master file, has a subjective entry regarding the TMF RM. Regarding the TMF RM it states: “it fails to specify any electronic format for consistent document and record exchange.” It then goes on to suggest another group is doing a better job: “In an effort to resolve the obstacles around the electronic exchange, sharing and interoperability of electronic trial master files, http://www.etmf.org eTMF.Org was formed in 2011 to develop a standard for the secure exchange and sharing of eTMF archives…” This is an organization that lists four experts on its website. This is in contrast to over one hundred industry professionals, including myself, who have worked over the past few years on the TMF RM.

Wikipedia can be a useful research tool when the articles are objective and well researched. This article is currently rated 3.6 of a possible 5.0 for objectivity. You can read it for yourself, and rate it accordingly at the following link.

Wikipedia eTMF Article

GxP Perspectives welcomes all comments on the TMF and the efforts by the TMF RM working group and others on the best way to advance a coherent, usable TMF guidance.

Carl Anderson, GxP Perspectives

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Join the GxP Perspectives Linkedin Group Here

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FDA has issued the final guidance, “IRB Continuing Review after Clinical Investigation Approval.” GCP Guidance Documents may be found here: FDA GCP Website. The new guidance is on the right in the section “In The News.”


GxP Perspectives is Thankful

November 24, 2011

GxP Perspectives is Thankful

GxP Perspectives
is Thankful

Today is Thanksgiving in the U.S., a day to be thankful for what we have. It is my favorite holiday. I enjoy eating and I think that saying “thank you” is pretty important. I’m thankful for the readers of GxP Perspectives on the Blog’s third Thanksgiving. I am in particular very thankful for the Guest Commentaries that have been submitted to the Blog. This year they have been great. I am also thankful for the ability to take a break once in a while (which I have been doing). And finally I’m thankful to my family and friends who seem to put up with me. OK- this is a short post but it does have two important announcements, one on the TMF Reference Model from Co-Chairs Lisa Mulcahy and Karren Redding and the other about the GCP CAPA Conference that GxP Perspectives is a media sponsor.

Carl Anderson – GxP Perspectives –
24 November 2011

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TMF Update:

Eighteen months ago, the only guide to the contents of the trial master file (TMF) was ICH-GCP, specifically section 6. Today we have the TMF Reference model, created by a wide variety of experts across pharmaceutical companies, CROs and technical vendors. Version 1.1 was released in February 2011, and has been adopted by many companies – pharmaceutical and CRO alike. The TMF Reference Model has also received positive feedback from the Regulators, with recent comments about what a great reference it is and how much hard work must have gone into it!

Version 1.2 will be released in December – The exciting addition is the adaptation for the contents of Investigator Site Files, facilitating alignment between trial master file contents at the Sponsor or CRO, and Investigator site file contents at the Investigator site. If this part of the model has the same uptake as the main TMF Reference Model, imagine how much easier it will be for the Investigators in terms of standardisation.

Watch this space closely – version 2 will be released early in 2012, to include device studies, process-based metadata and Investigator initiated studies. This is not the limit of the group developments – we are also looking at intra-operability from an electronic perspective, document destruction (a huge area of interest which extends way beyond the TMF) and even quality aspects of the TMF (a new idea put to us just yesterday!)

Karen Redding
Lisa Mulcahy
Co-Chairs of the TMF Reference Model

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2nd Annual Developing CAPAs in the GCP Environment 19-20 January 2012 in Arlington, VA. The keynote speaker is Dr. Leslie Ball, FDA, with a regulatory update on FDA’s Expectations for Clinical CAPAs and Reponses to FDA Warnings. For more information:

GCP CAPA Conference

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FDA Clinical Trials: Quality Considerations for Pivotal Studies

April 9, 2011

clinical trials considerations pivotal

When Should Quality Begin?

When should quality preparation begin for a pivotal phase III clinical trial? About once a month I get a call asking for help for a clinical trial because its time to get ready for FDA inspections. I ask “When will the application be filed?” The response? “Soon, very soon.”

It is a good thing to prepare for an FDA inspection. It is even better to prepare at the beginning, reviewing the quality considerations necessary to do the job right by “frontloading quality.” Here are some things I think you should consider. (Please take the survey at the end)

Phase III Considerations for Compliance with the FDA Bioresearch Monitoring Program: by Carl Anderson

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration conducts inspections of clinical trials as part of their Bioresearch Monitoring program. Although all FDA regulated clinical trials are subject to inspection, the large majority of inspections are the result of an application for the approval of an investigational product. Results of an FDA “Bimo” inspection can have a direct impact on the review and approval of an NDA, PMA, or BLA by the agency. FDA conducts inspections of clinical trials for two primary reasons:

1. To ensure the integrity of data submitted to the agency in support of an application.

2. To protect the safety, rights, and welfare of human participants in clinical trials.

The regulations that the FDA enforces for clinical trials are collectively known as the good clinical practice (GCP) regulations. They include 21 CFR Parts 11, 50, 54, 56, 312, 314, 601, 812, and 814. They can be found on the web at: http://www.fda.gov/oc/gcp/regulations.html. In particular FDA Bimo inspections cover the specific responsibilities required of sponsors and investigators covered by 21 CFR 312 Subpart D: Responsibilities of Sponsor and Investigators. For medical devices they are contained in Part 812.

The primary guidance document used for GCPs is the International Conference on Harmonization E6: Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guidance. This document is the international standard and the primary GCP regulation in many countries. ICH documents for clinical studies including E6 can be found at the link on the bottom

There are two types of GCP inspections that are of concern for sponsors. The first type is the inspection of clinical investigators at the sites where research is conducted. The majority of FDA inspections are of the investigators. The second type is the inspection of the sponsor or contract research organization. This is a routine inspection for medical device sponsors and is becoming more common at drug sponsors. Although most inspections are at clinical sites, in the event that serious deficiencies are documented, there can be directed inspections of sponsors that can result in serious regulatory action.

clinical trial consideration pivotal

QA for the Data Lifecycle

Prior to beginning a pivotal study the sponsor should establish a system of clinical quality assurance. This is a recommendation, not a requirement, of FDA. E6 defines quality assurance (QA) as: “All those planned and systematic actions that are established to ensure that the trial is performed and the data are generated, documented (recorded), and reported in compliance with GCP and applicable regulatory requirement(s).” Among the most important QA activities are the following:

Clinical trial materials. They should be produced in compliance with good manufacturing practice (GMP) regulations and qualified by an onsite audit.

pivotal clinical trial

Increased Enforcement of
Part 11

Computerized systems including eCRFs. There are many forward looking systems available for electronic case report forms (CRFs) including systems that are internet based. These vendors are not regulated by FDA and do not receive regulatory inspections. The burden is on the sponsor to determine if the vendor provides GCP compliant services. All should be qualified by an onsite audit.FDA has started looking a lot closer at eCRF systems.

Site management organizations (SMOs). These are unregulated organizations that provide support for clinical investigators and recruit study subjects. FDA inspections of sites using an SMO have frequently been cited for noncompliance with GCPs. SMOs should also receive onsite audits.

Central IRBs. These commercial institutional review boards have a better record than SMOs. However, the protection of human participants in research is a central FDA concern. Commercial IRBs should be qualified by an onsite audit.

Randomization services. This might not require an onsite audit and qualification, but the sponsor needs to critically determine that the vendor can supply the required services.

pivotal considerations for phase III clinical trials

QA Audits of Clinical Sites

Audits of clinical sites. ICH E6 states that: “The sponsor’s audit plan and procedures for a trial audit should be guided by the importance of the trial to submissions to regulatory authorities…” The sponsor should audit a pivotal clinical trial throughout the data lifecycle. In particular the sponsor should audit problematic sites during the study. It is the sponsor’s responsibility to “secure investigator compliance” if the investigator is violating GCPs. This was the first violation cited on the Sanofi-Aventis Warning Letter and has historically been a major violation cited on FDA Warning Letters to sponsors.

Top enrolling sites should always be audited during the course of the study because of their increased importance for a successful study and the likelihood that the site will receive an inspection by FDA. The sponsor should also audit sites that may be inspected by FDA at the conclusion of the study including data outliers, sites with a history of noncompliance, and sites that do not have a history of FDA inspections.

Database audits The sponsor’s data management activities should have independent QA review. This should include a qualification audit if data management is contracted out. An excellent resource for data management is the Society of Clinical Data Management. They publish a Good Clinical Data Management Practices Guide which is available for purchase on their website below.

Trial master file (TMF) audits: A TMF consists of the Essential Documents section of ICH E6. There should be QA review periodically throughout the study. The failure to adequately document a clinical trial will hinder any application to FDA. The agency field investigators have a saying that, “If it isn’t documented then it didn’t happen.” Take a look at the TMF page at the top of the blog for additional resources.

Pivotal clinical trial considerations

Conduct Regular GCP Training

GCP training: The sponsor should have a training program that includes initial and continuing training on good clinical practice. The training program should be in writing and training should be documented. At least once a year staff members should attend an outside conference, meeting, or workshop that includes clinical trial professionals that are not the sponsor’s employees.Peer-to-peer interactions are necessary to develop staff

GLP audits: The FDA conducts routine surveillance audits of nonclinical test facilities. An FDA inspector may randomly select a study of the sponsor to track as part of that inspection. Protocols and final reports are collected and sent to FDA headquarters as part of the inspection. The sponsor should always qualify a nonclinical laboratory used for GLP studies submitted to the agency. The new FDA Sponsor Compliance Program (see previous post) gives instructions for looking at nonclinical studies during GCP inspections at the sponsor.

Sponsor audits and mock FDA inspections

pivotl phase III clinical trials

Always Prepare for an FDA Inspection

Finally, a sponsor should conduct audits of their clinical management department and conduct “mock FDA inspections” in preparation for the regulatory audits that will inevitably take place after the NDA, PMA, or BLA is filed. Preparing for a regulatory inspection is invaluable for effectively hosting any regulatory agency, in particular FDA. Medical device sponsors need to remember that FDA typically inspects sponsors submitting a PMA. Drug sponsor inspections are on the increase. The “OAI” violation rate for inspections of medical device sponsors was 33% in fiscal year 2007. OAI stands for “official action indicated” the most serious classification.

An OAI classification can cause FDA to delay or reject an application.

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You can help out GxP Perspectives! Please let your colleagues and friends know about GxP Perspectives. I also encourage you to get an email subscription (on the sidebar to your right) or join the LinkedIn group (below).

Please take a short 3-question survey to help GxP Perspectives improve! Survey begins 22 SEP 2011

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This just in: Request for Comments- Exculpatory Language Used in Informed Consent, a joint FDA and OHRP draft guidance document (September 2011)

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Society for Clinical Data Management

ICH Guidance Documents
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On the Blogroll: PharmTech Talk has had a number of interesting blog posts of late.
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FDA clinical trials pivotal studies

On LinkedIn

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FDA Warning Letters in 2010 for GCP Failures

January 1, 2011

FDA Warning Letters GCP

FDA Maintains Pace for GCP Warning Letters
in 2010

After a significant rise in Warning Letters issued for GCP failures the past few years, FDA seems to have leveled off in the number of Warning Letters issued in 2010. I have not seen FDA metrics for Fiscal Year 2010 but my own review of Warning Letters issued to clinical investigators in 2010 doesn’t show a sharp increase, only more of the same. In particular, the primary deficiency categories are quite similar as they were 15 years ago when I attended my first FDA Bioresearch Monitoring course. Although the terminology has modernized over the years it can be summed up in four words: protocol adherence and recordkeeping.

UPDATE: I have posted below the BIMO FY-2010 Metrics below, courtesy of the Office of Good Clinical Practice- FDA/OC (many thanks). They are the people responsible for the Clinical Trials link on the FDA website. The metrics essentially confirm some of the conclusions of this post.

When looking at an FDA Warning Letter I am always curious about the very first charge that is listed. You will note that FDA does not use categories such as Critical, Major, or Minor as many company QA departments do. MHRA, the United Kingdom’s regulatory agency for health products, also uses a rating system, Major, Minor, and “Other.” However, FDA lists violations in the order of significance and the first item listed on either a Warning Letter or Form FDA 483, Inspectional Observations, is supposed to be the most significant. In ten Warning Letters I reviewed that were issued to clinical investigators in 2010 “failure to follow the investigational plan” was listed first on Warning Letters issued by the Center for Drugs four times. “Failure to conduct the investigation according to the signed agreement, the investigational plan, and FDA regulations was listed first in two Warning Letters issued by the Center for Devices and Radiological Health. The lesson here is that FDA pays close attention to protocol adherence.

FDA Warning Letters GCP

Keeping on Top of Records and the TMF

Recordkeeping violations were listed first on one Warning Letter but were included on eight of the ten Warning Letters I reviewed. Perhaps this is one of the reasons for the strong interest in the trial master file, the TMF. This pattern of violations has been happening a very long time. The first article I wrote after leaving FDA (six years ago) was called, “Protocol Adherence and Recordkeeping: The Twin Pillars of GCPs.” A typical Warning Letter was issued on 30 September 2010 (there is a link below). So the good news is that many researchers are paying attention to the increase in FDA Warning Letters the past few years and are instituting changes. The bad news is that there are still some people that keep repeating the same mistakes.

FDA GCP Warning Letter: 30 SEP 10

BIMO metrics – FY-2010

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A new feature from FDAzilla on FDA 483s

Read the Press Release on 483s

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Please join GxP Perspectives on LinkedIn at:

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Visit the TMF Page at the Top Right of the Blog! I am trying to assemble resources for those of us concerned with the Trial Master File. I welcome any contributions you might have of interesting articles and resource documents.

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In news from GxP Perspectives.

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On the Blogroll: Catalyst Biomedical – A blog that I recently discovered and that you may find of interest

Two Important New GCP Documents: There is a new Final Rule on required elements of Informed Consent. You can read the Federal Register Announcement here that includes FDA comments in the preamble. The exact change in 21 CFR Part 50 is:

“Sec. 50.25 Elements of informed consent.

* * * * *
(c) When seeking informed consent for applicable clinical trials,
as defined in 42 U.S.C. 282(j)(1)(A), the following statement shall be
provided to each clinical trial subject in informed consent documents
and processes. This will notify the clinical trial subject that
clinical trial information has been or will be submitted for inclusion
in the clinical trial registry databank under paragraph (j) of section
402 of the Public Health Service Act. The statement is: “A description
of this clinical trial will be available on
http:[sol][sol]www.ClinicalTrials.gov, as required by U.S. Law. This
Web site will not include information that can identify you. At most,
the Web site will include a summary of the results. You can search this
Web site at any time.”

Your comments are welcome on FDA Warning Letters


GxPs for the Holidays

December 12, 2010

GxP Perspectives

Happy Holidays from GxP Perspectives

GxP Perspectives wishes you, your family, friends & colleagues a wonderful holiday season. The Blog is taking a break until the new year but wants to leave you with a few tidbits of holiday cheer. First, there are just a few days left until the Trial Master File Reference Model Survey closes 16 December. I am attaching a link below. You can learn more about the TMF Reference Model on the TMF page aboove. Next, I am attaching links to a few blogs that I think are pretty good. Finally, I want to pass along an FDA warning to the fellows who might be seeking a little extra holiday cheer through the use of an herbal potion with the clever name of “Man Up Now.”

GxP Perspectives

Goodwill to All

Applied Clinical Trials: Their blog is one of the best.

Compliance Zen: “Practical FDA compliance insights and intelligence.”

FDA Law Blog: As described

FDA Matters: Keep up with what is happening at FDA in this blog from Steven Grossman

FDA Press Release on “Man Up Now.”

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TMF Webinar on 20 January 2011


TMF: Reference Model Explained

October 3, 2010

TMF Reference Model

What Documents are Necessary for a Clinical Trial?

Guest Commentary: A discussion on the trial master file (TMF) Reference Model presented to this summer’s annual meeting of the Drug Information Association (DIA). As clinical trials have evolved, regulatory authorities and GxP professionals have discussed the need for clear definitions and examples of the documents necessary for effective clinical trials. DIA began an effort to try and determine what would work in a globalized clinical trial environment. The result is the TMF Reference Model. While it is a work in progress, the TMF Reference Model has helped many clinical trial professionals determine how to record the data necessary to support a regulatory submission. This Guest Commentary by Karen Redding helps explain the concept of the TMF Reference Model.

Guest Commentary by Karen Redding

What is the TMF Reference Model?

The TMF Reference Model (TMF RM) is a single, unified interpretation of the regulations in the form of a list of TMF artifacts which would be accepted by all clinical trial stakeholders and which can be adopted or adapted by any company, institution or organization. It does not provide guidance in terms of the process by which the artifact is created or collected. It extends beyond regulatory guidance, such as ICH E6 section 8, which addresses only a sub-set of documents required in a TMF.

Who is sponsoring the reference model?

TMF Reference Model Explained

The TMF Reference Model
is a DIA Project

The initiative to create a TMF RM is supported by the Document and Records Management SIAC of the Drug Information Association (DIA). The TMF RM team consists of more than 130 representatives from 91 bio-pharmaceutical companies, contract research organizations (CROs), consultancies, technical vendors, industry groups, healthcare, academia, non-profit / NGO and regulatory agencies.

What is the structure of the reference model?

The TMF RM consists of standardized taxonomy and metadata and outlines the clear definition and organization of TMF content using consistent nomenclature. It is emphasized that this model is a reference and should not be considered mandatory, but rather as an opportunity for harmonization and alignment across the industry. The TMF RM can be adapted to an electronic or paper based TMF and by design does not endorse, nor require, any specific technology for application. The document types defined in the model are called artifacts. Version 1 .0 was released on 4th June 2010.

What are the key questions we are trying to answer in the upcoming meetings?

Collectively, the members of the TMF RM experience the same challenges, and many of these directly result in sub-groups being set up to provide a collective opinion. Current questions include:

1. How much does TMF management actually cost a company, how can we measure it, and how can we improve efficiencies?

2. What requirements need to be met to allow for a paperless environment, can we destroy scanned paper, can we retain documents in electronic form only?

3. Many studies are contracted to CROs, how much documentation needs to be maintained by the Sponsor to show oversight, and how is this oversight defined?

How do you get more information on the reference model? Is there a non-commercial website?

TMF Reference Model Explained

How To Get Involved With The TMF Reference Model?

The TMF RM group meets by teleconference every 3 weeks to discuss issues such as those above. Various sub-committees exist such as the Communications, Metrics, Paper Management and Review team, and these groups meet separately to discuss the specific aspects assigned to them. Many documents are published in the DIA Web Office. In addition, there is a LinkedIn group and a blog. You are invited to follow TMF RM activities on LinkedIn by joining the TMF Reference Model group.

The TMF blog address

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Please join your industry colleagues in completing the 2012 TMF Reference Model Survey, and use results to inform your TMF best practices.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/FPP8DCF

This fifteen minute survey is designed by members of the TMF Reference Model team to provide valuable insight into Trial Master File practices, both paper and electronic, to identify common problem areas, assess changes in practice and reveal opportunities for improvement. All respondents who complete the survey and provide contact information will be provided with the survey results.

Data collection closes June 1st; please join us today.

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Two Important New GCP Documents: There is a new Final Rule on required elements of Informed Consent. You can read the Federal Register Announcement here that includes FDA comments in the preamble. The exact change in 21 CFR Part 50 is:

“Sec. 50.25 Elements of informed consent.

* * * * *
(c) When seeking informed consent for applicable clinical trials,
as defined in 42 U.S.C. 282(j)(1)(A), the following statement shall be
provided to each clinical trial subject in informed consent documents
and processes. This will notify the clinical trial subject that
clinical trial information has been or will be submitted for inclusion
in the clinical trial registry databank under paragraph (j) of section
402 of the Public Health Service Act. The statement is: “A description
of this clinical trial will be available on
http:[sol][sol]www.ClinicalTrials.gov, as required by U.S. Law. This
Web site will not include information that can identify you. At most,
the Web site will include a summary of the results. You can search this
Web site at any time.”

There is a Draft Guidance on Electronic Source Documentation in Clinical Investigations. The comment period is for 90 day (April 4, 2011 ?)

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UPDATE: My favorite industry magazine, Applied Clinical Trials, now has a LinkedIn Group:
Applied Clinical Trials LinkedIn
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++++ In News From GxP Perspectives++++

TMF Compliance Documents from FDA

GxP Perspectives on the TMF

ALSO: Read the updated article on the Form FDA 1572 in:

Applied Clinical Trials “Closing Thought” on FDA 1572

ALSO: Please join me on LinkedIn at:

GxP Perspectives LinkedIn Group

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TMF Update: FDA References on Certified Copies and Original Data

August 25, 2010

FDA reference original data and certified copy

FDA References for Original Data & Certified Copies in Clinical Trials

As clinical trial professionals try to comply with FDA requirements on electronic records there are a number of documents that are referred to that are hard to find. One is the Compliance Policy Guide # 7150.13 referred to in the definitions section of FDA Guidance Document: Computerized Systems Used in Clinical Investigations (May 2007). It is referenced in the description of “Original Data.” FDA states: “FDA is allowing original documents and the original data recorded on those documents to be replaced by copies provided the copies are identical and have been verified as such.” FDA also has a definition of “Certified Copies” in the same guidance document.

Here are some links that will be of use in researching original data and certified copies:

Compliance Policy Guide 130.400 (equivalent to 7150.13)

Betterchem Link on Compliance Policy Guide

Applied Clinical Trials: CDISC Clinical Research Glossary

Read the Final Guidance from the European Medicines Agency on Electronic Data Capture:

EMA Reflections

Two Important New GCP Documents:

There is a Draft Guidance on Electronic Source Documentation in Clinical Investigations. The comment period is for 90 day (April 4, 2011 ?)

There is a new Final Rule on required elements of Informed Consent. You can read the Federal Register Announcement here that includes FDA comments in the preamble. The exact change in 21 CFR Part 50 is:

“Sec. 50.25 Elements of informed consent.

* * * * *
(c) When seeking informed consent for applicable clinical trials,
as defined in 42 U.S.C. 282(j)(1)(A), the following statement shall be
provided to each clinical trial subject in informed consent documents
and processes. This will notify the clinical trial subject that
clinical trial information has been or will be submitted for inclusion
in the clinical trial registry databank under paragraph (j) of section
402 of the Public Health Service Act. The statement is: “A description
of this clinical trial will be available on
http:[sol][sol]www.ClinicalTrials.gov, as required by U.S. Law. This
Web site will not include information that can identify you. At most,
the Web site will include a summary of the results. You can search this
Web site at any time.”

In news from GxP Perspectives read the updated article on the Form FDA 1572 in:

Applied Clinical Trials “Closing Thought” on FDA 1572

Announcement: TMF Webinar 14 October

ALSO: Please join me on LinkedIn at:

GxP Perspectives LinkedIn Group

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