FDA Guidance on Risk-Based Monitoring, Part II


FDA risk based monitoring

New FDA Draft Guidance Document

FDA’s new draft Guidance for Industry: Oversight of Clinical Investigations — A
Risk-Based Approach to Monitoring (August 2011) is the subject of a great deal of discussion among clinical trial professionals. On the GCP LinkedIn group some have written about their concerns that “centralized monitoring” would severely limit a sponsor’s involvement with clinical sites. Others have pointed out that the emphasis on developing a monitoring plan should ensure that appropriate resources are tageted to where they are needed.

Two weeks ago GxP Perspectives published a Guest Commentary by Lorraine Ellis on the new draft guidance. This Guest Commentary by Judith Lynn, continues the discussion about the new draft guidance. She looks at FDA Warning Letters in developing her review and analysis.

Guest Commentary: A Risk-Based Approach To Monitoring

I reviewed the Recent Draft Guidance From FDA- A Risk-Based Approach To Monitoring with several information points in mind:

• Warning letters from FDA, including the JNJ /ICON letter of 8/10/09
• My own experiences reviewing Clinical Study Reports, conducting TMF review and mock audits
• FDA Compliance Program Guidance Manual 7348.811, Clinical Investigators

I try to view the instruction as meant to be helpful rather than another obstacle to overcome. I found that much of the draft guidance centers on managing your study, having a sampling plan, and ensuring quality. FDA mentions that both good protocol and CRF design is critically important, as well as having a monitoring plan that takes into account the specific study, and sponsors prior experience with the investigational product.

Onsite monitoring:

FDA risk based monitoring guidance

Seriously Ill or Vulnerable Populations

I am not convinced that onsite monitoring will go away. The sponsor obligation is to ensure the protection of human subjects, that sites conduct trials appropriately, and the data is auditable and accurate. Note the point in the draft guidance under section IV/ C, Factors to consider when developing a monitoring plan: that “a population that is seriously ill and/or vulnerable may require more intensive on-site monitoring to be sure appropriate protection is being provided”. This point speaks volumes as to the value FDA places in onsite monitoring.

Early phase monitoring:

The guidance states “For a product that has either a significant safety concern or for which there is no prior experience in humans, may require more intensive monitoring to ensure appropriate investigator oversight.” It is interesting that FDA specifically encourages sponsors to be onsite in earlier phase studies, when the Agency does not typically send their own investigators- remember, they investigate either for cause or pre-approval.

In my experience with both bioavailability and first in man studies, the value of being on-site to observe unexpected safety and protocol issues, and make immediate decisions regarding study conduct, has been critical. Examples:

• safety issues a healthy subject (recent army recruit) collapsed at a blood draw (was excluded); a site had urine/blood test machine not work and had to test offsite, affecting dosing times/schedules
• dose issues, a nasal sprayer malfunctioned for an intranasal product; patches expected to be study for 12-24 hours fell off almost immediately

Electronic Data

risk based monitoring FDA guidance

Electronic Case Report Forms

Using electronic CRFs is a great boon to the industry. It gives almost instant access to data that used to take months to enter, review, check for consistency and plausibility.

Data Checks that used to come only at the end of a study are available throughout: such as missing forms; out of window visits; other inconsistencies. Immediate data availability can be used to track study progress, investigator compliance (with visits, data entry, inclusion/exclusion), and detect possible troublesome data fields/labels for a single site or throughout a protocol. However, only the data entered is available for central review (remote).

Use data to identify anomalies:

FDA risk based monitoring guidance

Questions Raised During Data Review

During an audit for a sponsor preparing for an FDA inspection, I focused on 2 critical efficacy evaluations (a 20 minute physician evaluation and MRI scan, done at select study visits). I requested data management to calculate the number of procedures performed on the same day at a specific site. I found it very interesting when data management responded:

• 22 physician evaluations were performed on a single day (by the same physician)
• 15 MRI scans were performed on one day.

None of the monitoring visit reports mentioned this kind of scheduling, the requirements for calibrating MRI machines, or whether there was more than 1 machine at a site.

It may be worthwhile to spend more time during the study reviewing available study data. You may need to create customized reports to follow the metrics on your study. Consider the value of team review rather than individual review, in order to understand what your data may be indicating.

FDA warning letters often include observations that may be found during onsite monitoring:

fda

FDA Warning Letters

• Problems with original signatures on informed consent documents. Informed consent documents are not usually submitted to sponsors/monitors, but are reviewed during onsite visits.
• Non-serious adverse events were present in source documents that were not reported to the sponsor. Without onsite review, the sponsor cannot know what is missing.
• Inadequate records, including remarks regarding inappropriate delegation (unqualified person performing procedure or not signed/dated by investigator). Many sites around the world have paper records, and without onsite review, the sponsor cannot be aware of inadequacies.
• Inadequate accountability of the test article.

Monitoring plan considerations:

You may decide to reduce the number of onsite visits. Do this wisely. Ideally the monitoring plan is another tool that helps confirm the validity of your study data. Have your monitors perform activities onsite that cannot be performed remotely.
Source data: Often, only limited source data is available remotely for centralized review.

Finally, remember what the FDA is instructing their inspectors to do, and develop your plan in anticipation. The FDA inspection manual requires inspectors to:

• review logs of onsite monitoring visits
• describe the investigators source documents for legibility and completeness
• review the informed consent process.

Ideally the sponsor will not be surprised what is found when a Regulatory agency goes to the study site.

Judith Lynn, Pharmaceutical Consultant, September 2011

Read the Draft Guidance Document

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How to comment to FDA: Here is a two-slide powerpoint presentation on how to comment on the draft guidance document courtesy of CDRH BIMO. Thanks!

Location of Monitoring guidance FR

The Federal Register Docket Number is FDA-2011-D-0597

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Pacific Regional Chapter SQA Fall Training 10-11 November at Allergan in Irvine, CA. The training will feature a debate which should be an interesting development in training workshops: Debi Garvin, MS, RQAP-GLP and Paula Parsons: Debate: The role of CAPA in a GLP environment.

PRCSQA Fall Training

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Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development: Article on Protocol Amendments: One Third can be avoided.

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Training Opportunity:

training GxP

Audits & Risk Management

GxP Audit & Risk Management Congress: 20-21 October 2011, Philadelphia, PA. This conference combines both GMP and GCP tracks to maximize the opportunity for cross training, shared best practices, and networking. Two members of the GxP Perspectives LinkedIn group, Janice Wilson and Adi Lampmann, are among the faculty. The conference is sponsored by ExL Pharma and GxP Perspectives is a media partner.

GxP Audit & Risk Management Brochure

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You can help out GxP Perspectives! Please let your colleagues and friends know about GxP Perspectives and the discussion on risk-based monitoring. I also encourage you to get an email subscription (on the sidebar to your right) or join the GxP Perspectives LinkedIn Group (below).

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FDA vs. Dr. Oz: Should you be drinking apple juice? Television personality Dr. Oz says that there are dangerous levels of arsenic in apple juice. The FDA disagrees. They point out that the tests Dr. Oz conducts are for total arsenic, inorganic and organic, and only inorganic arsenic represents a danger to public health. Read the FDA press release for a detailed explanation.

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On The Blogroll: PharmTech Talk discusses the Top Ten FDA 483 Observations for drug GMP inspections. Angie Drakulich reports that Numero Uno concerns Quality Control Units (QCUs).

My Perspective by Kathryn Davis, Clinical Development. In this new blog on WordPress Kathryn Davis discusses relevant issues including social media, GCP, and recruiting minorities in clinical trials.

The Dark Daily Laboratory and Pathology News

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FDA Clinical Investigator Course,
7-9 November 2011, Silver Springs, MD

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clinical trials FDA monitoring guidanceThere have been some great comments on the GxP Perspectives LinkedIn group on the Draft FDA Risk-Based Monitoring guidance document and on protocol deviations. There is also a new logo for your viewing pleasure. I invite everyone to join the GxP Perspectives LinkedIn Group and join the discussion.

GxP Perspectives LinkedIn Group

GxP Perspectives on twitter: @GxPPerspectives

Follow GxPPerspectives on Twitter
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Please comment on the new draft guidance on Risk-Based Monitoring.

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